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Resilient Cities and Adaptive Law Pt 4: Adaptation & Resilient Cities

By |August 22nd, 2013|Categories: Biophliic Cities, Blog, Guest Blog|

This is the fourth of four parts about resilient cities and adaptive law. Read part 1, part 2, and part 3 here.)  In a recent Environmental Law Reporter article, “Adaptive Law and Resilience,” resilience scientist Lance Gunderson and I have identified aspects of the U.S. legal system that are maladaptive to interconnected nonlinear change in social systems and ecosystems and offered an alternative view of an adaptive legal system.  This blog addresses three aspects of law that are relevant to cities and their resilience: local governance, private property rights, and adaptation. Resilient cities will need to develop new or reformed legal and policy tools in order to enhance their adaptive capacity.  One improvement, already practiced by some cities, would be to adopt policies that aim [...]

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Resilient Cities & Adaptive Law Pt 3: Private Property Rights & Resilient Cities

By |August 15th, 2013|Categories: Biophilic Cities, Biophliic Cities, Blog, Guest Blog|

(This is the third of four parts about resilient cities and adaptive law by guest columnist, Tony Arnold. Read part 1 and part 2 here.) In a recent Environmental Law Reporter article, “Adaptive Law and Resilience,” resilience scientist Lance Gunderson and I have identified aspects of the U.S. legal system that are maladaptive to interconnected nonlinear change in social systems and ecosystems and offered an alternative view of an adaptive legal system.  This blog addresses three aspects of law that are relevant to cities and their resilience: local governance, private property rights, and adaptation. The institution of private property is an aspect of both American culture and U.S. law that also affects the resilience of cities.  In a number of respects, legal protections of private [...]

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Resilient Cities & Adaptive Law Pt 2: Local Governance & Resilient Cities

By |August 8th, 2013|Categories: Biophilic Cities, Blog, Guest Blog|

(This is the second of four parts about resilient cities and adaptive law by guest columnist Tony Arnold.  Please click here to read the first post.) In a recent Environmental Law Reporter article, “Adaptive Law and Resilience,” resilience scientist Lance Gunderson and I have identified aspects of the U.S. legal system that are maladaptive to interconnected nonlinear change in social systems and ecosystems and offered an alternative view of an adaptive legal system.  This blog addresses three aspects of law that are relevant to cities and their resilience: local governance, private property rights, and adaptation. The polycentric structure of an adaptive legal system offers tremendous opportunities for cities to be leaders in social-ecological resilience.  Many commentators decry the lack of centralized control over land use, [...]

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Resilient Cities and Adaptive Law Pt. 1: Resilience Science & the Legal System

By |July 31st, 2013|Categories: Blog, Guest Blog|

(This article is Part 1 in a 4 part series on "Resilient Cities and Adaptive Law" by guest columnist Tony Arnold.) Are cities resilient – or can they become more resilient – in the face of significant and uncertain disturbances that affect interconnected natural, physical, and social systems, such as climate change, water scarcity and/or flooding, land-development pressures, food-supply insecurities, civil unrest, economic collapse, the effects of pests and invasive species, deforestation, and the like?  Growing research on resilience science and legal institutions suggests that part of the answer to this question has to involve whether laws and legal systems can become more adaptive to nonlinear change in complex, interconnected systems. A recent article, “Adaptive Law and Resilience,” published by resilience scientist Lance Gunderson and [...]

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Houston’s Biophilia Boom

By |July 24th, 2013|Categories: Blog, Guest Blog|

Houston is once again a boom town.  The city’s robust economic recovery and strong jobs market led The Atlantic to proclaim in May 2013 that “Houston is Unstoppable,” one of many accolades of late that has drawn attention to our nation’s fourth largest city.  But unlike in years past, the attention paid to Houston is not just about its economy. Photo Courtesy of Houston Parks Board Houston is in the midst of a biophilia boom. Houston is going green. In November 2012, voters approved a $166 million Parks Bond that will create 150 miles of all-weather hike and bike trails completely separated from traffic along the city’s bayous with roughly 1,500 acres of connected linear parkland by the year 2020, thus tripling the [...]

Part 2: Biophilia is Catching in the Nation’s Capital

By |July 1st, 2013|Categories: Biophilic Cities, Biophliic Cities, Blog, Guest Blog|

(This article is second in a two-part series on Biophilia in Washington, DC, written by Stella Tarnay.  Click here to read Part 1.) Here in the nation’s capital, a movement is afoot to bring nature into the direct experience of residents and for the benefit of the overall environment. Dennis Chestnut, executive director of Groundwork DC  , is reaching out to high school and middle school students to teach them about Watts Branch, a stream that runs for two miles through residential neighborhoods and into the Anacostia River (one of the nation’s most polluted urban waterways). Students will sample, study, and WALK along the stream’s edge, getting to know an ecological treasure right in their own back yards. Further up the river, the Anacostia Watershed Society [...]

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